The Internet of Things (IoT) is gaining steam with connected devices creating more data than ever before. According to a new report by Cisco, more than half of IP traffic will come from devices other than PCs and there will be 7.3 billion machine-to-machine connections by 2018 —that’s about the same amount of connected devices as there are people on earth.

Business intelligence is at a tipping point. More and more people are discovering that everyone in an organization can use big data analytics to meet and exceed business goals. But while the mindset is shifting, there are still some long-held assumptions that have plagued the industry, fortifying the biggest myth of all—that big data analytics is only valuable to a few business people. Historically, business intelligence has been viewed as an on-premise platform that was operated by a team of data scientists who extracted insights reserved only for C-level executives.

Evolution

If you are going to analyze data successfully, you need to keep in mind that analytics are evolutionary. Analytics need to evolve along with an organization's applications, business processes and even the organization itself. But this is easier said than done – If you are going to enable an evolutionary analytical process, you need an agile development process, you need iterations.

There is no doubt that across all industries – be it healthcare, retail, manufacturing, or finance – there are a few themes pushing today’s companies to take a closer look at business intelligence solutions: the rise in popularity of analytics (especially given the increasingly mainstream discussion and use of big data); the rise of data discovery and end-user empowerment; and lastly, the increase in the market’s use of cloud-based BI solutions.

A month ago we held a webinar entitled “Disentangling Discovery and BI— Understanding the Differences between Birst and Tableau.”  The webinar detailed a new study conducted by Blue Hill Research.

My first car cost 100 British pounds. It was an Austin Mini and had a 1 liter engine so it didn’t go very fast. Back in the 70s, I guess partly inspired by Starsky and Hutch, it was de rigueur to put go-faster stripes on your car in order to make it at least look like it went faster than it actually did!

I believe we are at the beginning of a new era for business – one where data becomes as important an asset as money and people. I also believe harnessing the power of data is in its infancy. Not only has technology changed to allow the capture and processing of much larger volumes and varieties of data, but more importantly, the business climate has changed. Data is widely perceived, if misunderstood, by a much larger percentage of business leaders as a strategic asset.

It’s hard to grow as a company if your market space is not. The good news for us is that Cloud BI is growing at a rapid pace and, as such, so are we. But growth can lead to a lot of confusion and it’s always great to get outside opinion. If you haven’t had the opportunity to read any of the market study from Dresner Research and you are either looking to invest in a business intelligence solution or are wondering whether you’re considering the right vendors, now’s the time to check out what they have to say.

With all the hype around big data at the moment, one might easily ignore how mobile technology could lead to a huge change in the way people access and use business intelligence (BI). They may also miss its possibly profound impact on this marketplace.

We passed a major milestone at Birst this month, earning the highest certification for handling sensitive data as set by the International Standards Organization. The ISO 27001 certification signals to the world that Birst’s cloud services platform meets rigorous standards for maintaining a systematic and ongoing approach to managing sensitive company and customer information.

Last week, Birst announced its new Embedded BI program specifically designed for software companies looking to differentiate their products by turning data into a strategic service for their customers.  Paul Staelin, Birst’s Chief Customer Officer, shares his thoughts on this new program below. Here are a few interesting details we wanted to share:

There, I’ve said it. I think it’s a question that needs to be asked because the answer isn’t a clear one to most of us. Data discovery is a rapidly growing part of the business intelligence (BI) market. In fact, millions of dollars are being spent on these tools annually. But the question remains, is data discovery actually a good thing?
I continue to be perplexed by the rise in popularity of data discovery so perhaps I should take a moment to explain my thinking.

It’s remarkable how quickly and easily we can accomplish major tasks with the software of today. Traveling, for example, is an area that has massively benefitted from the innovations around software. You can book a flight using any number of travel websites, send your boarding pass with frequent flyer information to a smartphone, and check your flight status using the airline’s mobile app.

I’ve been writing about the rise of the Chief Data Officer as the latest  ‘C-level’ executive that most companies will need to manage the mountains of operations data.

Birst FORWARD 2014, our third annual user conference, wrapped up last week, and I was pleased to see so many familiar—and new—faces this year. With more than 250 in attendance, this was our largest and most successful user conference to date. Birst prides itself on being very much a customer-centric and partner-centric organization, and I could really feel the camaraderie among the Birst community over the course of the three days.

This morning, Birst made an exciting announcement. As Birst continues to grow, it has been my goal to build the best management team in the Business Intelligence and Analytics sector. To that end, I’m delighted to announce that today Birst appointed a new CEO, Jay Larson.

It’s spring in San Francisco and Birst is getting ready to host our annual user conference, Birst FORWARD 2014, which brings customers, partners and colleagues from around the world to the city where Birst was founded and is headquartered. Spring is one of my favorite times of year and I’m looking forward to sharing my enthusiasm for this city, as well as some of the local sites and attractions, with Birst conference attendees.

In 2010, President Obama signed into law the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. While interest groups and party extremists continue to debate nearly every facet of the law, one major component has been widely gaining momentum while out of the public forum: a provision that allows healthcare providers to create Accountable Care Organizations, which seek to tie patient outcomes to reimbursements.

I recently had the opportunity to participate in a podcast series on marketing technology with Glenn Gow, Managing Director of Crimson Marketing. During the interview, we discussed the continued alignment of sales and marketing, and the issue of increased accountability for marketers today with regard to quantifying Sales Qualified Leads and other marketing metrics. Much of this stems from the increasingly important role data plays as an underlying strategic resource in today’s organizations.

Successful businesses run on data. There’s a lot of value in looking at information within your business systems, comparing quarter over quarter growth or comparing regions to one another. But what about when you want to compare data across systems, from multiple data sources and types? You want to understand how your marketing campaigns have influenced your customers’ buying decisions over the past year, 5 years and 10 years. What if you want to map those campaigns against customer locations to see if particular messages have resonated with specific regions?

Pages